Astro/Night Photography SIG

 

A great way to meet up with like minded night owls to plan field trips, share planning and learn from each other. We meet the 2nd Thursday of each month via zoom to plan an outing for the month. Typically we try to get out once a month but we keep a conversation going in What's App to let each other know when we're heading out. Night shooting is best done with buddies.

For more information contact Sheila at:
sheila.jc@outlook.com

 

Gallery

Forum

 

The following photos are recent astrophotography images by Larry Doucet

   
 

Elephant Trunk Nebula: 

  • Capture August 13, 2022 from my backyard in Calgary.  This is a Bortle 7 zone.
  • 25 x 5 minute subs with additional flats, darkflats, and darks
  • Using an STC duo narrowband filter allowing light at 656nm and 500nm (Ha and Oiii)
 

M31 – The Andromeda Galaxy:

  • Captured Aug 30, 2022 from the south shore of Pigeon Lake (Poplar Bay).  This is a Bortle 4 zone.
  • 12 x 1 minute and 12 x 3 minute subs with flats, darkflats, and darks.
    • The two exposure times were to allow capture of the faint outer areas of the galaxy without blowing out the center core area.
  • Using an Optolong L-Pro general light pollution filter.  Even in a Bortle 4 there is some light pollution.
  • Interesting tidbit:  The Andromeda is 2.5 billion light years away and contains a trillion stars.  It is destined to collide with the Milky Way in about 5 billion years (about the time our sun turns into a red giant).  If you zoom in the image, you can see nebula (red patches) and star clusters in the galaxy.  This is the most distant object that we can see with the naked eye (you need good eyes, a dark sky and know where to look).
   
 

 

 
   
 

Lobster Claw, Bubble, and Northern Lagoon Nebula:

  • Captured over two nights, September 2-3, 2022 from the south shore of Pigeon Lake. 
  • 19 x 15 minute and 34 x 10 minute subs with flats, darkflats, and darks.
  • This is a faint set of emission nebulas located in the constellation Cassiopeia (on the edge of it actually). 
  • Using the STC duo narrowband filter.
  • Interesting tidbit, that tiny bubble at the upper right is about 7 light years in diameter.  Our sun and our nearest stellar neighbor would fit comfortably inside that bubble.
 

 

 

 Mossleigh, AB
Images by Sheila Jarvie

Forget-me-not Pond, Kananaskis
   

 

 




 

 

 




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